Boat Yoga

In our house boat home, boat yoga means something entirely different than yoga on a boat.

Instead of a regenerating, powerful, exhausting hour of power yoga which left me feeling like I simultaneously worked out and had a deep tissue massage, boat yoga is the process of contorting oneself into various degenerating, awkward and exhausting poses while trying not to drop something critical somewhere you can't reach during a boat project.

I need to do yoga to straighten my spine after boat yoga. And there is the problem. Where can I do yoga on the boat?

Instructors of mine used to say there is no excuse for not doing yoga, everyone has enough room to lay down a yoga mat somewhere and that is all the room you need.

Except I don't.

There is no where on the floor inside the boat the size of a yoga mat, and nowhere flat outside the boat the size of a yoga mat. I do a lot of basic sun salutations and even into chattarongas, and I'm trying to figure out what else I can do in the main salon without breaking myself or the boat. I'm nothing if not stubborn goal oriented.

And let me tell you, try doing any part of a balancing series on a moving platform!! Burly.

When I have it figured out, I'll let you know.

- Livia

8 comments:

  1. You could do it on the tramp between the two hulls? Oh, no, you can't. Sorry. ;)

    I do agree 100% though. Doing some nice stretching after getting all contorted while working on the boat would be great!

    Mike

    PS: 34 days! WOW!

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  2. Yeah, I call it "bilge yoga" because it must always be performed in some deep inaccessible nook rather than in the open. Don't forget the boat project hypothesis: if you can see it, you probably can't reach to touch it; if you are able to reach it, you probably can't see it.

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  3. @Mike - That's why we call a cat our retirement boat (oh SNAP) ;) PS - this "cattiness" is just jealousy on my part regarding the tramp
    @Mark - niiiice

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  4. Sadly, for me it is not only "trying not to drop something critical somewhere you can't reach during a boat project", but also "recovering something dropped during a boat project".

    From my days as an auto mechanic, I have a 24" remote "grabber" that sometimes helps, and my lovely, thoughtful wife got me this for Christmas last year.

    (Sometimes I feel like an arthroscopic surgeon!)

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  5. Nathan understands "boat yoga." Unfortunately I have yet to experience this painful exercise. The closest I have come is 88' Ford Ranger Yoga: getting curled up underneath the (open) hood of the truck above the engine while trying to change out an electrical component on the distributor!

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  6. Somehow - I can't imagine how - you forgot to mention that the mat was replaced by either a longish bolt in the spine or a hose clamp somewhere worse.

    Yes, catamarans have nice tramps, but narrow bows and transoms offer some of the most advanced yoga oportunities as well!

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  7. Just think of the killer core muscles you'll have if you do manage to build moving boat deck balance. Burly will bow down to you.

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  8. @Lauren - You'll just have to come visit to experience it yourself.
    @Drew - Ugh. Like a canoe stern boat.
    @Willowjp4 - I can dream.

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